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Alexandra I. Magold, PhD

Postdoctoral Researcher

Alexandra received her BS/MS degree in Molecular Medicine from the University of Freiburg in Germany. In 2011, she completed her PhD in Neuroscience at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, working on Alzheimer's Disease (AD). Her PhD research revealed the broad involvement of Wnt pathways in gamma secretase dependent gene expression in mouse models and human brain tissue. Investigating the role of cerebral ciliation Alex collaborated with the Swartz-lab, where she continued her postdoc discovering lymphatic endothelial ciliation. After a stint at the Weizmann Institute working on Cancer Stem Cell Biology and p53 dependent mechanisms, she has rejoined our group which had in the meanwhile relocated to the University of Chicago.

In her free time she volunteers with Chicagos Goethe Institute and runs a website based podcast propagating passion for science via short interviews of accomplished friends in STEM.

Want to work with me? Email me to learn more.

Current Research

Lymphatic Endothelial Ciliation​

Cilia are smart data processing units, turning mechanosensation into cell signaling. 

I have reason to believe that the cilia I discovered on lymphatic endothelial cells play roles in the immune activation of the lymphatic endothelium. 

Currently I am using the mouse model we developed,  investigating phenotypes of reduced lymphatic endothelial ciliation (more concrete info to follow after publication). 

I have also developed a deep interest in lymphatic endothelial roles in various infectious diseases and am part of our COVID team. 

Cilia Talks

PME Immunoengineering Science Hour - Microscopy special 2021 program

Lymphatic endothelial ciliation

Lymphatic forum Chicago 2017  abstract   program

Primary cilia on lymphatic endothelial cells and their roles in flow sensing

Publications pre-discovery of LEC ciliation

Gene expression profiling in cells with enhanced gamma-secretase activity.

Magold AI, Cacquevel M, Fraering PC.PLoS One. 2009 Sep 18;4(9):e6952. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0006952.

Predominant fiber atrophy and fiber type disproportion in early ullrich disease.

Schessl J, Goemans NM, Magold AI, Zou Y, Hu Y, Kirschner J, Sciot R, Bönnemann CG.Muscle Nerve. 2008 Sep;38(3):1184-91. doi: 10.1002/mus.21088.